HipMamaJenn
One Plus One by JoJo Moyes is a Predictable, Light-Hearted Romance

Jess is a working class single mom with problems piling up on her. One of her many jobs is working as a cleaner. She finds herself in a position to take a substantial amount of money from someone, which will greatly change her life without anyone every finding out.

Ed is a tech guru who has made some mistakes when he chooses ladies. One such mistake may end up sending him to prison. Add in two kids who don’t quite fit in and an immature and absent ex-husband and you have the backbone of One Plus One.

Moyes works in some social issues, mainly the economic difficulties of the working class, but for the most part One Plus One follows a traditional romance novel formula. There is a heavy hand of a morality tale to the book as well as every character is “punished” for questionable choices and is only rewarded when they come clean. Skip this one if you are looking for an enlightening or original read. Grab it if you want a well written but easily digestible love story with lots of laughs.

My Rating: 3 of 5 stars

Pub Date: July 7, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-525-42658-5

Page Count: 384 pages

Publisher: Pamela Dorman Books

*Thank you NetGalley for a review copy of this title in exchange for my honest review. 

voxmagnetic:

contentloveknowles:

Sweet  at Hope Outdoor Gallery July 22 2014  ATX
~Don’t Forget To Be Awesome~

Austin Vox

John & Hank Green’s reach is far!

voxmagnetic:

contentloveknowles:

Sweet  at Hope Outdoor Gallery July 22 2014  ATX

~Don’t Forget To Be Awesome~

Austin Vox

John & Hank Green’s reach is far!

bakerstreetbabes:

The address is 221B Baker Street.
Panorama (1234)

This is so magical.

Christmas in July Book Swap: Something Sweet, Something Blue, Something Homemade, Something New

I was invited to participate in a Christmas in July Book Swap by the lovely ladies at Book Monsters. Upon accepting the invitation, they asked me to fill out a brief questionnaire about books on my wishlist and other things that I like. 

I was partnered with the splendid and dynamic Angie from My So Called Chaos. My package arrived yesterday and what a thrill! She sent me a copy of The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton. The design of the book is elegant and inviting and I can’t wait to have some free time to dig in. She also included a little colorful sugar, a beautiful handmade bookmark and wine lover charms (which I have turned into earrings) from the artisan Purely Paige. Thank you so much Angie and thank you Book Monsters for the invitation. 

Support “The Chairs’ Hiatus” in Hardcover on Kickstarter

Author and Illustrator Matthew Bogart has released the entire book of "The Chairs’ Hiatus" on his website. You can read the sweet and funny story of two girls, Nel and Mary who become incredibly successful in their band The Chairs. Mary doesn’t want the fame and seeks out a new life in a new city. Part Scott Pilgrim, part Blankets and completely original this story is about everyday friendships and the hardships that go along with them.

Matthew Bogart has started a Kickstarter campaign with the goal of turning the ebook into a physical book. The art will be in two colors and the book will be in a hardcover format. 

Be a part of the history of this graphic novel and check out the Kickstarter for “The Chairs’ Hiatus”. 

artschoolorbust:

Anatomy of an AP Art Student’s Desk: Part I, before the desk is actually even in the room.
I’m currently in the process of replacing my very old and very short art desk, so I thought I could do a quick-n-snarky inventory just for funsies. 
Part I: Side Desk
Half built shrine to the god Thespus, because this art student is also a theatre geek. Shrine is complete with incense, crystal ball, Honor Thespian certificate, and vague ceramic pieces that a younger student made me.
Under the desk, we have a travel easel and storage container of fabric (because all my money is going to art supplies, so I’m making my own clothes. Oops).
Part II: Short Desk
This desk is barely knee-high when you stand next to it, so a pillow and prep-school blanket are necessary to achieve maximum sitting comfort.
Below the desk, we have boxes of snacks (so that I don’t ever have to leave), poly-fill (from my stuffed animal making phase), and a box labelled “Strong, Rebeca” (stolen from a roommate to ship my art home) containing nothing important, but hey, maybe someday?
Middle shelf: Yarn, white t-shirts from an abandoned project, abandoned iPad, and other assorted crap. Next to this shelf is every type of paper and canvas you could possibly imagine.
On top of the desk: in-progress linocut project and various knives, diet soda, brushes and water, legal pad and pens, painting of someone’s breasts, and a motivational (?) fox statuette. Also, my retainer case, missing the actual retainer for a few years now.
Part III: The Right Shelves
On the first set of shelves: Lamp, gel pens, charcoal of varying thicknesses, printing inks, mod podge, about 7000 crayons, higgins watercolor inks, assorted brayers, blades, vine charcoal, and those letter beads (for making snarky bracelets). Next to the shelf, a bright green tube of drawings.
On the second set: Watercolors, watercolor paper, cranberry juice, an alpaca pencil case, and more legal pads. 
Can you tell I have a legal pad problem? I’m such a compulsive list maker, I think I would die if I had to stop buying them.
I would also like to mention that 90% of the art on my walls was given to me by the impeccable hipmamajenn, and the A+ portraits of me were done by an Interlochen student named Natalie!

This makes me so happy! Thrilled that the art work that @shooteditsleep donated to Playhouse 1960 years ago is still feeling the love. Send me your addy and I will send you some new pieces.

artschoolorbust:

Anatomy of an AP Art Student’s Desk: Part I, before the desk is actually even in the room.

I’m currently in the process of replacing my very old and very short art desk, so I thought I could do a quick-n-snarky inventory just for funsies. 

Part I: Side Desk

  • Half built shrine to the god Thespus, because this art student is also a theatre geek. Shrine is complete with incense, crystal ball, Honor Thespian certificate, and vague ceramic pieces that a younger student made me.
  • Under the desk, we have a travel easel and storage container of fabric (because all my money is going to art supplies, so I’m making my own clothes. Oops).

Part II: Short Desk

  • This desk is barely knee-high when you stand next to it, so a pillow and prep-school blanket are necessary to achieve maximum sitting comfort.
  • Below the desk, we have boxes of snacks (so that I don’t ever have to leave), poly-fill (from my stuffed animal making phase), and a box labelled “Strong, Rebeca” (stolen from a roommate to ship my art home) containing nothing important, but hey, maybe someday?
  • Middle shelf: Yarn, white t-shirts from an abandoned project, abandoned iPad, and other assorted crap. Next to this shelf is every type of paper and canvas you could possibly imagine.
  • On top of the desk: in-progress linocut project and various knives, diet soda, brushes and water, legal pad and pens, painting of someone’s breasts, and a motivational (?) fox statuette. Also, my retainer case, missing the actual retainer for a few years now.

Part III: The Right Shelves

  • On the first set of shelves: Lamp, gel pens, charcoal of varying thicknesses, printing inks, mod podge, about 7000 crayons, higgins watercolor inks, assorted brayers, blades, vine charcoal, and those letter beads (for making snarky bracelets). Next to the shelf, a bright green tube of drawings.
  • On the second set: Watercolors, watercolor paper, cranberry juice, an alpaca pencil case, and more legal pads. 

Can you tell I have a legal pad problem? I’m such a compulsive list maker, I think I would die if I had to stop buying them.

I would also like to mention that 90% of the art on my walls was given to me by the impeccable hipmamajenn, and the A+ portraits of me were done by an Interlochen student named Natalie!

This makes me so happy! Thrilled that the art work that @shooteditsleep donated to Playhouse 1960 years ago is still feeling the love. Send me your addy and I will send you some new pieces.

"The Shadow Hero" by Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew Brings the Golden Age Comics Back to Life

The Shadow Hero is a grand undertaking by acclaimed artist and author Gene Luen Yang and illustrator Sonny Liew. In the 1940’s, known as the Golden Age of comics, unknown cartoonist Chu Hing created a World war II superhero named the Green Turtle. He wore a mask and cape and his face wasn’t shown to readers. Instead his turtle like shadow was visible. 

The Green Turtle defended China and it is rumored that Hing intended the superhero to be Chinese. There were blatant and offensive racial stereotypes in the books, mostly aimed at Chinese characters. Only five issues of the book were made.

Now, 70 years later Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew have revisited and expanded upon the original books. In their re-imagining the hero is clearly an Asian American. They also introduce a complicated mother character. She is quick witted, strong and proud of her son but she is not without flaws. Far from being used strictly for comic relief the mother adds humanity and humor to the storyline. 

Mostly drawn in sepia tones with bolts of red and green the illustrations blend a nod to tradition with the form and expression of contemporary illustrations. The story also has a traditional feel with a modern humor and sensibility. Some of the racial slurs can be difficult to read but the pain is worth it for the glory to read of an Asian American superhero. 

The graphic novel which was released on July 15th contains the first 6 issues which can also be bought individually or read online. A benefit of reading the books in the graphic novel format is the extra section at the back of the volume. it includes a note from the author about the history of the original books, how he found the material and why he and Sonny Liew created the new books in the manner that they did. It also has several pages of reprints of the original books. 

This is an excellent book for fans of superheros, people hoping to understand the Asian American experience in the 1940’s and fans of graphic novels. 

The book is comprised of the following issues: 

The Shadow Hero 1: The Green Turtle Chronicles  

The Shadow Hero 2: The Dawn of a Golden Age

The Shadow Hero 3: Fathers and Sons

The Shadow Hero 4: Fights You Cannot Win 

The Shadow Hero 5: True Colors 

The Shadow Hero 6: Enter the Green Turtle 

Each issue has an original cover and is available via Amazon, Apple, and B&N.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Publication Date: July 15, 2014

ISBN: 9781596436978

Page Count: 176 pages

Publisher: :01 -First Second

*Thank you :01 for a preview copy of this title.

Word of Mouth Propels “Boyhood” to Box Office Success - Some Twitter Highlights

There isn’t much that makes me happier than supporting a piece of art; be it film, written word or visual art to see it enjoyed by a wide audience. This weekend the film opened to a slightly larger audience and the reaction on social media was instant, passionate and persistent. People are moved by this film. Below are some of my favorite tweets from writers, television personalities and regular film goers. 

bigger news is Boyhood from IFC Films, which looks to take around 34K per screen for another strong weekend as it expands its way across the country. It jumped 39% from Friday to Saturday…” (Source: Deadline Hollywood)

Boyhood is a reminder of how crappy 98% of Hollywood movies are. It’s that good.

— Mo Rocca (@MoRocca) July 20, 2014

Wondering about the elusive Black Album in #Boyhood? Check out the exclusive track listing on @BuzzFeed! http://t.co/5XNQ1K6X0g

— IFC Films (@IFCFilms) July 21, 2014

The personal and the political in #Boyhood: http://t.co/NvLIpETxOx

— Alyssa Rosenberg (@AlyssaRosenberg) July 21, 2014

Did you see #BOYHOOD or hoping to watch it soon? Listen to our podcast w/ stars @PattyArquette & Ethan Hawke: http://t.co/kJLh8cRr2J

— Kendall Cinema (@KendallCinema) July 21, 2014

Finally got around to seeing #Boyhood. THAT’S how you do a 3 hour movie, Michael Bay

— Patrick Kavanagh (@PatrickKTV) July 19, 2014

How did economics present challenges for filming @BoyhoodMovie? http://t.co/WwAwbxftXX #Boyhood #filmmaking pic.twitter.com/mVo7p8OoQZ

— 92nd Street Y (@92Y) July 18, 2014

I broke my four-week movie detox with #Boyhood. An incredible idea with impeccable execution. I smiled, wept copiously and came out wiser!

— Anupama Chopra (@anupamachopra) July 17, 2014

"Boyhood" Breaks the Mold of Cinematic Storytelling

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood is a transcendental film that elevates story-telling by simplifying it. This film could be titled: American Boy Growing Up in Texas in the 2000s. It is a coming of age story but instead of being about just one person, this film allows peeks into the ever-changing minds, lives and loves of the boy’s entire family. Made over a span of 12 years, the film was an experiment in concept. The crew would reconnect every year to film new sections. It was a huge risk that paid off in the best possible ways.

Mason Jr. (Ellar Coltrane) gets in trouble at school for forgetting to hand in his homework and trying to sharpen rocks in the pencil sharpener while his sister, Sam (Lorelei Linklater), has a major attitude and straight A’s. Their mom is sick of their simple life and struggling to live pay-check to pay-check. They re-locate to Houston so that she can go back to college and her mom can help with childcare.

The story leaps ahead without any of the gimmicky forward and backward story structure, just a naturally paced, forward thrust.  Linklater does a masterful job of showing us the setting with what we see and hear in the background. The film opens in 2002. We see a Sears Catalog, 

 Beauty and the Beast sheets and hear Coldplay’s Yellow. Anyone who catches these references will automatically understand the impact that each had in their own lives, whether they were children or adults. If they were alive in America at that time, they will recognize these cultural benchmarks.

Besides the aforementioned pop culture hints as to the time periods, Linklater allows his actors to age, shows their changes in attire, homes and loved ones to show the passage of time. On several occasions the Texas car registration is visible in the corner of the windshield which reveals the years ticking by.

What makes the film different is that it doesn’t feel like a fictional film, it feels like a documentary or what reality television could be. There are no judgments made on the characters by the film-maker. The characters judge each other, but there are no good guys or bad guys here, just people doing their thing and trying to figure out why and how to do it right. The acting is flawlessly under stated and natural. The risk of hiring un-known child performers and following them for a 12 year span paid off generously.

The sometimes sophomoric humor of Linklater (Dazed and Confused) can be found in chunks throughout the movie, but it has a tone closer to his Before trilogy (Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight), which are dialog and thought heavy.

Boyhood is not just a coming of age tale, it is also a love story to Texas. From Houston, to San Marcos, to Big Bend to Austin, Linklater shares the small homes, alleyways, storefronts, clubs and expansive wilderness that Texans celebrate with pride. The location adds nuance to the significance of some of the plot points. When the kids are hanging Obama signs in 2008, and when 15 year old Mason is given a Bible for his birthday, we can relate a different intensity because of the social intensity of these two topics in the region.

Linklater has drawn strong female characters in the film. Patricia Arquette as Olivia, almost single-handedly raises two children while earning an undergrad degree and eventually a doctoral degree to teach psychology. She changes physically as well, leaping out of the Hollywood leading lady norm of a tiny woman to a full figured woman. As she ages she remains beautiful, insightful and appealing to men, which unfortunately remains a novelty in American cinema.

Boyhood is long, slow-paced, has no major plot points and is not for everyone, but for those who enjoy introspection, candid glimpses into other worlds and reflection; it may be the best film of the year.